Japanese encephalitis vaccine how long before travel?

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Timmothy Schamberger asked a question: Japanese encephalitis vaccine how long before travel?
Asked By: Timmothy Schamberger
Date created: Fri, Mar 12, 2021 12:31 AM
Date updated: Wed, Sep 28, 2022 9:48 PM

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Top best answers to the question «Japanese encephalitis vaccine how long before travel»

IXIARO is given as a two-dose series, with the doses spaced 28 days apart. Adults aged 18–65 years can get the second dose as early as 7 days after the first dose. The last dose should be given at least 1 week before travel.

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The last dose should be given at least 1 week before travel. A booster dose (third dose) should be given if a person has received the two-dose primary vaccination series one year or more previously and there is a continued risk for JE virus infection or potential for reexposure.

Travelers who cannot complete the primary vaccine series ≥1 week before travel should be counseled to adhere rigidly to mosquito precautions if they will be at risk for Japanese encephalitis.

You can, however, travel fairly safely if you start your TBE vaccination at least six months in advance. Two doses of the JE vaccination are given, with the second dose occurring 28 days after the first, or at an accelerated rate of seven days after the first dose.

Tell your vaccine provider if the person getting the vaccine: Has had an allergic reaction after a previous dose of JE vaccine, or has any severe, life-threatening allergies. Is pregnant. Pregnant women should usually not get JE vaccine. Will be traveling for fewer than 30 days and only traveling to urban areas. You might not need the vaccine.

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends JE vaccine for people moving to a JE-endemic country, longer-term (for example, ≥1 month) travelers to JE-endemic arears, and frequent travelers to JE-endemic areas.

JE vaccine also should be considered for shorter-term (e.g., less than 1 month) travelers with an increased risk of JE based on planned travel duration, season, location, activities, and accommodations.

JE vaccine should be considered for 1) short-term (<1 month) travelers to endemic areas during the JEV transmission season if they plan to travel outside of an urban area and will have an increased risk for JEV exposure; 2) travelers to an area with an ongoing JE outbreak; and 3) travelers to endemic areas who are uncertain of specific destinations, activities, or duration of travel.

Japanese encephalitis is a rare but sometimes fatal disease for which a vaccine is available. If you are only planning a short-term visit, or will be based in major cities such as Tokyo, Osaka, and Kyoto, you will likely not need this vaccine. However, if you have any doubts, consult with a doctor or medical professional before traveling.

The Japanese Encephalitis vaccine is given as a two-dose series, with the doses spaced 28 days apart. However, the CDC indicates that as part of an accelerated schedule, adults aged 18–65 years can get the second dose as early as 7 days after the first dose. The last dose should be given at least 1 week before travel.

Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine for US Children. Measles. Infants 6 to 11 months old traveling internationally should get 1 dose of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine before travel. This dose does not count as part of the routine childhood vaccination series. Measles (Rubeola) (CDC Yellow Book) Routine vaccines.

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